Research on Adolescents and STD's

Factors Associated with STDs in Young Adults:

  • SCarol A. Ford, et al., “Predicting Adolescents’ Longitudinal Risk for Sexually Transmitted Infection,” Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine 159.7 (July 2005): 657–664.
  • Adolescents who perceived that their parents more strongly disapproved of their having sex during adolescence were less likely to have STIs 6 years later.
  • Feelings of connection to family or school, reported importance of religion, attending a parochial school, and pledges of virginity during adolescence did not predict STI status 6 years later.
  • Most factors associated with increased duration of virginity in adolescence do not influence the trajectory of STI risk.

 

The full text of this article may be obtained online for a fee.  For more information:

See the abstract here: www.cababstractsplus.org/abstracts/Abstract.aspx?AcNo=20053132655
or contact your local librarian.
If you have difficulty finding this article, you may contact SIECUS www.siecus.org/feedback.html.

Adolescent Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experience with STDs:

  • Tina Hoff, et al., National Survey of Adolescents and Young Adults: Sexual Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experiences (Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2003).
  • One in five young people believe that they would simply “know” if someone they were dating had an STD and almost one in six mistakenly believe that STDs can only be spread when symptoms are present.
  • About one in 10 young people either doesn’t know you can get an STD through oral sex or thinks that oral sex poses no risk.
  • About one in four sexually active adolescents, and half of sexually active young adults, report having been tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, and about the same percentage report having been tested for other STDs.

 

The full text of this article may be obtained online for free through the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation www.kff.org/youthhivstds/3218-index.cfm


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